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Former Vox journalist mocked for claiming victim of ‘stolen courage’ in Twitter spat

Former Vox journalist Aaron Rupar was mocked on Twitter on Thursday after he likened failing to get credit for videos he tweeted to “hearts stolen.”

According to the military website Home of Heroes, “‘Stolen Valor’ is a term applied to the phenomenon of people falsely claiming military awards or medals they didn’t earn, service they didn’t perform, POW experiences that never happened. , and other stories of military action that only exist in their heads.”

Rupar, now an independent journalist, reacted angrily when Mike Sington, a former senior executive at NBCUniversal, tweeted a video of a Herschel Walker campaign speech.

Pointing to Sington’s tweet, Rupar said, “This guy loves posting the exact same videos others have already posted without any attribution. Pretty sleazy and I’m not the only one who noticed.”

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Twitter has been conducting fact checks on government tweets for the past few days.

Twitter has been conducting fact checks on government tweets for the past few days.
((AP photo/Matt Rourke, file)

Sington replied that the insult was unintentional and wondered how he could make amends: “Aaron, I’m not trying to be sleazy. I thought the clip was from OAN, their logo is on it. Willing to learn, what had should I do differently?”

Rupar was not reassured and accused Sington of ripping off his video “for stolen courage”.

He replied, “RT mine? I actually watched the speech, you lazily saw my video go viral and decided to scam it for stolen courage. You do this all the time and people notice. Give people credit for their work when it must.”

Rupar’s comparison earned him a “Community Note” from Twitter. This is a form of reader-generated fact-checking. The note clarified: “‘Courage Stolen’ is a phrase that refers specifically to people posing as veterans to claim social benefits…While it may be in bad taste, reposting news clips from a third party is qualitatively different.”

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A veteran holds an American flag during the annual Veterans Day Parade on November 11, 2022 in New York City.

A veteran holds an American flag during the annual Veterans Day Parade on November 11, 2022 in New York City.
(Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Conservatives on Twitter mocked the comparison.

Spectator Contributor Stephen Miller wrote, “Aaron Rupar likens sharing publicly edited video clips to ‘heart-stolen’.”

“Thank you for your service of….watching cable TV,” US Marine and Townhall writer Julio Rosas tweeted.

Digital strategist Greg Price joked, “As someone who also tweets clips, I completely agree with you. It’s unpatriotic to post a clip after we’ve already posted it. We bravely get up in the morning, let our families behind and going into the trenches to post things we see on TV on social media and that has to be respected.”

Washington Examiner columnist T. Becket Adams wrote, “A great exchange. I honestly can’t say if it’s a little bit or if Aaron genuinely believes it’s a form of ‘cowardice’ to share videos cut from a public address.”

“What Defending Democracy Looks Like, FOLKS,” wrote Federalist columnist Eddie Scarry.

“Every day this guy wakes up and makes the conscientious decision to be the worst person on Twitter. He never falls short,” said Ellen Carmichael, president of Lafayette Co..

Illustration photo.  (REUTERS/Kacper Pempel)

Illustration photo. (REUTERS/Kacper Pempel)

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He included a joking image of Vietnam War veteran Lieutenant Dan (Gary Sinise) from the movie “Forrest Gump,” with the caption “lost my legs cutting Newsmax interviews in ’16.”

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